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Archive for the ‘University of Bath OPuS’ Category

Snowman in a tree

Snowman in a tree


Requisite snowman picture

Yesterday’s launch of Opus, our repository was held in the department of Mechanical Engineering’s e-lounge. This location itself deserves a mention – it’s a fantastic space for students, with study tables, slim SunRay computers, food dispenser machines, and to add some class, some beautiful artwork on the walls. We took over half of the space for an hour for the Opus launch event (but the students did get the benefit of chips, drinks and sandwiches after we’d done!).

I mentioned that I’d post the information I’d covered in my part of the presentation. Brian Kelly has blogged about this at his UKWebFocus blog but I wanted to focus on a few things. We’ve been really lucky to have the support of the Vice-Chancellor for Research, as well as Library, Web Services, Office of Policy and Planning and also UKOLN. I tried to mention these people in my presentation yesterday, but also took the opportunity to take a captive audience of Heads of Departments and other guests to say a little about Opus and the surrounding issues. I suggested a few immediate courses of action to the researchers and authors present:
1. When you’re back in your office, check your publications list to make sure it’s correct. Send me any corrections or amendments.
2. Upload your latest paper.
3. Take the time to read the next Copyright Transfer Agreement that comes across your desk. Make sure it gives you the right to share the content of your work. Contact me if you would like help.
4. Save the Accepted Version of your papers as this is often the version you are permitted to place online under a standard publisher agreement.
5. Well, I’m sure there was more but that’s enough for today. I’ve got two departmental meetings to present at today, and on Friday there is a one hour session on Opus that focuses on the practical side of the things mentioned above. Uni of Bath staff are welcome to join us, contact me for details.

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Today saw the official launch of Opus, the University of Bath research repository (‘Opus’ being short for Online Publications Store). There is an internal news item on the uni website with a brief outline of events.
I am hoping this means the work will really begin, now that it has been officially put in the public sphere. I know there are publications details in there at present that need correcting, but it needs the owner of the work to point these out sometimes.
Still , a relief to get this up and out there. Thanks to Adam from Eprints Services who sorted out a few last minute bits and pieces, from possibly the most comfortable office in the world. Actually, speaking of thanking people, I’ll put an outline of the text of my speech up here tomorrow (too late tonight and I’ve got icy roads to navigate to get home).

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For shame, for shame. The thing I hated most when researching on blogs in libraries: the abandoned blog. I think perhaps it’s been more of a dry spell really. A long time between drinks? A hiatus? And WordPress have moved everything around in here.
We spent the summer collecting and then checking and re-checking publications for the Research Excellence Framework Pilot on Bibliometrics, which was a mammoth task, although now hearing of other larger institutions woes, perhaps we got off quite lightly.
Very busy with Opus, our repository, tidying up records and getting ready for our launch in February. Go and take a look. Can I just say how great Eprints Services have been? They’ve been great. And the silver lining to the REF cloud is that now we have masses of metadata records in our repository.

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We are one of twenty-two institutions in the UK who have been selected to participate in the Research Excellence Framework Pilot Exercise. This exercise will be looking at how well citation analysis, or bibliometrics measures up. I’m off to London next Wednesday to find out more at a HEFCE briefing, so will have more to report after that. What this does mean is that we’ll be collecting all staff publications between 2001-2008 – a huge job, and putting them in the repository. Clearly this isn’t something you can do without decent ingest mechanisms or import tools.
Speaking of tools, there’s a product that’s come up recently called Symplectic from Imperial College in London. It looks very interesting, with a publications management module, a content management system, and a module for student management. I believe they’re working on integration with DSpace (already available) and Eprints (working on this).

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I’ve been doing a number of training sessions lately, for a number of different, err, stakeholders in the repository. Today I have my first session with the five librarians that will be helping to administer the collections, and perform the mediation on deposits.

I’ve split the sessions up, ostensibly into three meetings over three weeks. The first will cover the basics – open access, institutional repositories, copyright and permissions (plus licences and terms and conditions – exciting!) and versions. We’ll also go over the main features of our DSpace installation, from an end-user perspective. I’ll ask them to log in, then before our next session I’ll add them as administrators to their particular area of responsibility.

I’m aiming to give them all a chance to reflect on what they’ve covered between one session and the next. It really is a lot to take in, and I remember back to the three days I spent at the RSP Summer School in June 2007 and the breadth of information we took in – quite a lot to get your head around.

It will really help to have extra hands to check submissions – not because I’m flat out but because it provides a continuity of service (so I can go on hols over Easter!). Also I’m rolling out the promotion for the repository over the next few weeks, in a fairly understated kind of way. This week it’s e-theses, to coincide with the university ‘Innovations Week’, where e-theses get a stand in the Claverton Rooms cafeteria. The week after it’s ‘Meet the new Research Publications Librarian’ (me!) announced on the internal news pages. Finally, around, or maybe just after Easter it’s a ‘Know your Author rights’ campaign. *That* should be interesting…

Well, better sign off here. Almost time for the training session number one.

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It’s been a while since I looked at the EthosNet instructions on DSpace OAI Crosswalk plug-in. I’ve created a separate community within OPuS, our repository, and plan to use this for harvesting. I’ve added at least the basic metadata fields outlined so those are ready to go.
Now, I’m going out to the masses today, to the University Research Students Committee to present a paper on the topic of e-thesis, and how they’re to be collected. Initially we’ll collect them on CD/DVD but at time goes on I don’t see any reason why we couldn’t have the PhD and MPhil students submited direct to OPuS. It’s a gently, gently approach for now. We’re using much the same method as Exeter, described by Ahmed Abu-Zayed at the UKCoRR meeting last November (that long ago?!).
Which reminds me – now that I’ve found the UKCoRR website, I’m keeping it here for future reference: http://www.ukcorr.org/index.php

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At our meeting yesterday, Mahendra from UKOLN raised a very good point about directing traffic to our repository. Considering that conversations about page ranking and Google keep cropping up, particularly with reference to linking to the publisher version of paper, this is an important way of directing traffic and raising our profile. Obviously I need to get the repository linked from as many places as I can. The obvious place to start is the Open Access repository registers.
I’ve registered with most of the Open Access registeries of repositories I can think of – ROAR, OAI, the BASE search engine, and ScientificCommons. I’ve got my eye on the Intute Repository Search project, starting late January. Have I missed any, or is there a list of sites to register with, somewhere?
Probably – please drop me a line and let me know.

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