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Archive for the ‘training’ Category

UWE MSc

Hello to any UWE MSc in Information and Library Management people who may be reading this! Tonight is the first session this semester for the ‘Academic Libraries’ module I’m teaching. I’m looking forward to it, and to meeting the students. I’ve been buried in repositories for so long now that the MSc Academic Libraries module is an opportunity to keep up with library life outside of open access and publications lists.

We’re using Peter Brophy’s ‘Academic Libraries’ as the core text, but I’m slipping in a chapter from Tara Brabazon’s ‘University of Google’ in week 5 when we cover Information Literacy and Educational Technology.

Any suggestions on what should be covered in an academic libraries module for an MSc welcomed.

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I had a quick trip up to the Wirral on Wednesday for the Repository Support Programme Summer School 2008. The event was held at Thornton Manor, a fabulous country pile built by Lord Leverhulme of the Sunlight soap empire. I was only at the summer school for Wednesday afternoon but the RSP team pulled their speed networking card again, and I learnt a lot about the state of other repositories just from five minutes of introduction and synopsis from other attendees.
I gave a quick presentation as the Graduate of last year’s summer school, but the*really* interesting talk came afterwards, when we were treated to a telling of Leverhulmes’ life and achievements. The speaker called Lever one of the most well known men of his time, a real mover and shaker, one of the first to take corporate responsibility for his employees.
Then, ironically yesterday when I returned to work, I had a paper to upload which had been sponsored by BBSRC and the Leverhulme Trust. So that sent me over to the Leverhulme Trust website. Of course I’ve heard of UniLever and we had Sunlight soap when I was knee high to a grasshopper, but I would never have thought there was such an amazing story behind it all..
The RSP Summer School continues today and tomorrow, and I’ll try to link to any blog posts I find on the event.
Thornton Manor

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After two long weekends in May, these five day work weeks in June are rough. June is looking busy though, with some big repository decisions coming up here, and then I’m out and about a couple of times. Next week, on the 12th June is the UKeIG Annual Seminar where I’m doing a session on Web 2.0 in academia : what works and why. I’ll put my slides on slideshare soon.
The week after, the RSP are holding their summer school again, this time in Thornton Manor in the Wirral.
I ranted about the beautiful location last year, at Dartington Hall near Totnes – someone is doing really well picking these summer school locations! After speaking with Stephanie yesterday, I think I’ll be giving a short ‘graduate’ talk.
Then, the week after that is the UC&R seminar at UWE on Web 2.0 (can’t find a link for this one at the moment).
Towards the Askenden Pub, Cambridgeshire
We were in Cambridge last week and stayed at a FarmStay in NE Essex called Rockells Farm – it’s a lovely spot, and for the fishing enthuasists, they have their own stocked lake.. We strolled to Arkesden for dinner at the Ax and Crosses – excellent food, get there early.

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I’ve just written a quick email to the Versions toolkit team to say what a great document they’ve produced – possibly the best, most practical thing I’ve read all year. It’s just so common-sensical. It lays out some useful milestone versions, and provides guidance on identifying versions, including an author checklist of information to include in a document that might be placed on open access.

This is something to keep at the forefront of our submission interface design and I’ll be adding it to our repository information pages..

The VERSIONS toolkit.

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I’ve been doing a number of training sessions lately, for a number of different, err, stakeholders in the repository. Today I have my first session with the five librarians that will be helping to administer the collections, and perform the mediation on deposits.

I’ve split the sessions up, ostensibly into three meetings over three weeks. The first will cover the basics – open access, institutional repositories, copyright and permissions (plus licences and terms and conditions – exciting!) and versions. We’ll also go over the main features of our DSpace installation, from an end-user perspective. I’ll ask them to log in, then before our next session I’ll add them as administrators to their particular area of responsibility.

I’m aiming to give them all a chance to reflect on what they’ve covered between one session and the next. It really is a lot to take in, and I remember back to the three days I spent at the RSP Summer School in June 2007 and the breadth of information we took in – quite a lot to get your head around.

It will really help to have extra hands to check submissions – not because I’m flat out but because it provides a continuity of service (so I can go on hols over Easter!). Also I’m rolling out the promotion for the repository over the next few weeks, in a fairly understated kind of way. This week it’s e-theses, to coincide with the university ‘Innovations Week’, where e-theses get a stand in the Claverton Rooms cafeteria. The week after it’s ‘Meet the new Research Publications Librarian’ (me!) announced on the internal news pages. Finally, around, or maybe just after Easter it’s a ‘Know your Author rights’ campaign. *That* should be interesting…

Well, better sign off here. Almost time for the training session number one.

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I’ve just drafted a couple of papers for various meetings, and I’m also working on an FAQ page for the repository. My RSS feeds have just alerted me to this new publication by Charles Bailey – at first inspection it’s a good introduction especially for repos people at the coalface but I think I’ll include a link to it from our FAQ for a general audience.
Institutional Repositories Tout de Suite is available from Charles Bailey’s very good ‘Digital Koans‘ blog at http://www.escholarlypub.com/digitalkoans/2008/01/06/institutional-repositories-tout-de-suite/

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I’ve been neglecting the blog about lately as I’ve had my attention diverted elsewhere. This week has been taken up with the Internet Librarian International Conference in London. It seemed to be a well-recieved conference (apart from lots of muttering under the breath about the ridiculous cost of wifi – I mean, honestly, in this day and age a hotel that charges £10-$20 per day for wifi!?), with lots of attendees from the UK, the Netherlands, Scandanavia and more.

There were a number of repository related events, including a pre-conference Masterclass on Sunday morning presented by Frank Cervone from NorthWestern University in Illinios in the States. Frank covered the whole gammit of repository development which was useful although he lost me a bit on the OAIS Model and Objects and Behaviours – that’s going to be homework..

If you’re interested, many of the presentations are available from the conference website, including the presentations from Brian Kelly and myself in the ‘Blogging Inertia and 2.0 Scepticism’ slot. Nice to see the conference wiki, which is a great place for finding all those clever people who were blogging or twittering throughout the event.

There are photo’s from the event collected via Technorati available here.

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My husband is getting irate because I keep saying ‘while I’m on holiday’ instead of ‘at the conference’. Freudian slip, I’m sure.

The LWW7 conference is held in Molyvos on the Aegean Island of Lesvos. The conference theme is: Exploring ‘anytime, anywhere’ delivery of library services, with an international line-up of presenters on a variety of topics. I’m looking forward to Margaret Markland’s paper on ‘Publishing, Policy and People; three constraints upon institutional repository development’ and Jane Secker and Gwyneth Price speaking on ‘Libraries as a social space: enhancing the experience of distance learners using social networking tools‘, along with a raft of other papers that look good.
I’ll report back after the jump.

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Kelvin’s working on our DSpace install, wading through the documentation and nutting out integration issues. We paid a visit to the University of Bristol repository people on Friday afternoon, and I think this helped a lot. They’ve been in the repository game a lot longer, and Naveed, their tech support has implemented a lot of tweaks, including a patch for metadata only records which DSpace apparently doesn’t support. Again, being able to meet face to face with colleagues who have already been down this road is just invaluable.
I’m yet to find anywhere that has linked up their research expertise database with their full-text repository. Can the two not co-exist!?
Beagles
At the Frome Cheese & Agricultural Show on Saturday, the Wiltshire & Infantry Beagles

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The Internet Librarian International Conference in London, October 8-9 has a repository masterclass. Run by Frank Cervone of Northwestern University, USA it’s called ‘Repositories and Digital Initiatives’. The class is on the Sunday 7th October, before the conference. It looks very practical and the blurb says ‘through this step-by-step road map and by looking at examples of repositories that have been implemented in many different countries, you’ll leave the session ready to plan your own’. I like the idea of looking at existing examples, that’s my learning style..
Another quick plug – on the Sunday afternoon is the session ‘Using blogs effectively within your organisation’, run by Brian Kelly and myself.. Quick, sign up!.. :)

The turret

Our newly re-slated turret and re-painted finial.. a sizable architectural quirk on our otherwise tiny house! A work of art really, by Dan and Jay – roofers extraordinaire…

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